About

You could call us the Uber of Advertising.
We own the platform (Client, Strategy and Creative),
but we do not own the cabs (Execution).
We partner with independently owned specialist agencies
who focus exclusively on delivery.

Pangea Ultima is a future supercontinent that will arise when all the continents merge again. This will be similar to when it all started with a single continent, with one key difference. Sovereign countries will now be defined, but bound by a single landmass. This is the perfect analogy for the state of the Marketing Communications Industry.  It all started with everything under one roof, which eventually split apart. Today we are faced with an unprecedented level of agency fragmentation. The “future” will see it all come together again, but in a new world order. We are this new world order. We believe this future is a collection of sovereign countries (specialists) operating under one global law (the big idea) bound by a global court (Strategy and Creative) living in one space (Pangea Ultima) You could call us the Uber of Advertising. We own the platform (Client, Strategy and Creative), but we do not own the cabs (Execution). We partner with independently owned specialist agencies who focus exclusively on delivery.

Executive

HAYDN TOWNSEND
CEO

JAMES CLOETE
CREATIVE DIRECTOR

GARETH LESSING
CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Board

HAYDN TOWNSEND
CHAIRMAN

MOHALE RALEBITSO
EXECUTIVE MEMBER

SIZAKELE MARUTLULLE
EXECUTIVE MEMBER

JAMES CLOETE
EXECUTIVE MEMBER

GARETH LESSING
EXECUTIVE MEMBER

Team

Show All
Blk Ops
Ever
Kavod
Moonchild
Pangea Ultima
Prestine Moods
  • Read More
    Haydn Townsend
    CEO & Chief Strategist
    Pangea Ultima
  • Read More
    Mohale Ralebitso
    Board Executive
    PANGEA ULTIMA
  • Read More
    James Cloete
    Creative Director
    Pangea Ultima
  • Read More
    Gareth Lessing
    Creative Director
    Pangea Ultima
  • Read More
    Thato Cassuto
    Group Account Director
    BLK OPS
  • Read More
    Colett Naidu
    Account Director
    Pangea Ultima
  • Read More
    Naomi Meyer
    Strategic Planner
    Pangea Ultima
  • Read More
    Lee Goodal
    Copywriter
    Pangea ULtima
  • Read More
    Daniel Edwards
    Multimedia Designer
    Pangea ULtima
  • Read More
    Kyle Ballie
    Art Director
    Pangea Ultima
  • Read More
    Ruggero Bonomi
    Managing Director
    BLK OPS
  • Read More
    Michelle White
    Group Account Director
    BLK OPS
  • Read More
    Matseko Motlhala
    Account Executive
    Blk Ops
  • Read More
    Terrence Chimbuya
    Operations Manager
    BLK OPS
  • Read More
    Jenna Spilkin
    Account Manager
    Blk Ops
  • Read More
    Nthabi Mofokeng
    Account Manager
    BLK OPS
  • Read More
    Chantal SIthole
    Account Executive
    Blk Ops
  • Read More
    Thabiso Mokaba
    Store Manager
    Blk Ops
  • Read More
    Lior Manelis
    CEO
    PRESTINE MOODS
  • Read More
    Rory Townsend
    3D CONCEPT DESIGN
    KAVOD
  • Read More
    SIZAKELE MARUTLULLE
    Executive Director
    MOONCHILD
  • Read More
    Vaughn Thiel
    Lead Digital Marketing Strategist
    EVER
  • Read More
    Pierre Nel
    OPS MANAGER / DIGITAL MARKETING SPECIALIST
    EVER
  • Read More
    Ntsikelelo Riaan Khuzwayo
    Digital Marketing Specialist
    EVER
  • Read More
    Noel Rhalf
    General Manager
    EVER
  • Read More
    Karabo Mkhabela
    Web Developer & Designer
    EVER
  • Read More
    Dean Barlkey
    Digital Marketing Specialist
    Strategist
    EVER
  • Read More
    Chris Smith
    Digital Marketing Specialist
    EVER
  • Read More
    Moonchild 2

Services

Eventing

EVENTING – With our creative and experiential event results your next event will be a big hit. Our team has years of experience in perfecting events and engaging with audiences in the most exciting and compelling ways.

Advertising

ADVERTISING – We bring your brand to life with humour, essences of life and passion. Our team has a whole lot of talent and out-of-the-box ideas to help you cut through the noise and reach your audience in the most relevant ways.

Strategy

MARKETING AND BRAND STRATEGY – We help your brand stay relevant by getting to know your audience. We delve into research and draw out insights about your consumers by immersing ourselves in their world. Strategy plays a key role in helping your brand’s growth, and to stay up-to-date with your core consumer’s needs.

Activation

ACTIVATION – Brand activations connect with consumers on a one-on-one basis and provide a personal brand experience. Activations are key for cutting through the clutter of today’s world of brands.

Digital

DIGITAL AND SOCIAL – With so much information readily available and everyone on social networks, digital advertising is growing rapidly. We provide
interactive and creative campaigns to maximize reach and target your audience at exactly the right time and place.

Branding

BRANDED CONTENT – Branding carries the image of a brand. We make people come to your brand and secure your brand’s presence in the mind of
your consumer.

News

Click Below to Open Article

Reshaping African advertising as we know it - by Haydn Townsend

Pangea Ultima: Reshaping African advertising as we know it
 By: Leigh Andrews

A new local boutique ad agency opened its doors just a few weeks ago. Here’s what Pangea Ultima stands for and how it intends to reintegrate marketing as a whole.

The words ‘Pangea’ evokes images of an old world – one of unity and integration, especially if you run a Google Image search for the term. Fitting then that new ad agency ‘Pangea Ultima’ is so named as a geographic analogy of the marketing communications industry.

IMG_3429-3Founders Hadyn Townsend (chairman and CEO), James Cloete and Gareth Lessing (creative partners) explain that Pangea is the name given to the single landmass from which the continents we know today split apart. Ultimately the continents will drift back together as the world is round, and this new super-continent will be called Pangea Ultima.

Townsend adds that this is exactly what happened to the marketing industry we know today: it all started as one single entity with multiple departments such as media, research and promotions, but these departments eventually split apart to form the myriad of agency types we are flooded with today.
Townsend argues that the time for these to come back together as a collection of separate entities working as one is now. Here’s why…

1. Let’s start with the basics: When and how did the agency get started?

Townsend: Officially, we launched on 1 September 2015, but we have been building the partner network over the last year. Once we had the key partners and building blocks in place, we officially went to market.

2. Explain Pangea Ultima’s strategy and what makes you stand out from the rest.

Townsend: Over the years, the fragmentation that is now plaguing the industry brought with it an unintended consequence: the duplication of creative and strategyacross every agency. So while the intention was always to remove the implementation components from the central agency, these implementation agencies found themselves in a quandary as they still relied on the “lead agency” to deliver conceptualisation. As the pressure mounted to show value, these agencies started bringing in the creative component as a “loss-leader” as their core businesses is and always has been implementation/execution. This then is where the fragmentation begins. Each agency nibbles itself further and further away from the central idea.
Even if the idea integrity is maintained, the nuances will vary enough to create discomfort, as the same team is not overseeing it creatively. We completely eliminate this duplication and inconsistency by having numerous independent agencies all serviced creatively and strategically from one central point.

3. Why is the reintegration of marketing and advertising then so important?

Townsend: Whilst the communication channels to market have proliferated, the need for idea consistency has increased. The more touch points, the better chance of reaching the right consumer, but the greater the risk of misrepresentation or confusion. To this end, a marketing and advertising unit that is 100% aligned and 100% delivered is fundamental to success. Without it, you will end up with more noise than harmony.

4. What’s the basic workflow or creative process in the agency?

Townsend: The key differentiator for us is that you have one central port of call whether you require a digital campaign, activation or a TV ad. Whilst the entities remain independent, they have project managers that deliver on projects, but we have one central account management lead for the client interface. Even the billing is done centrally, minimising multiple invoices along with all the removal of other duplication such as statuses etc. and their associated cost.

5. Let’s talk about the state of the local advertising awards industry…

Townsend: There is no doubt that we are world-class when it comes to “traditional” advertising. The tricky bit is when we leave these conventional categories and venture into the realms of Titanium or Digital – this is where we come unstuck. We seem to be struggling to break into these worlds, for a host of reasons. Marketing investment in these areas remains comparatively underfunded with the dominance of TV in our country perpetuating this problem. We subsequently don’t have enough skilled creatives who can think beyond the lucrative ATL arenas that still has significant runway in SA, but seriously putting us on the back foot at the global award shows, who are visibly migrating away from ATL in its traditional form.

6. Let’s shift focus to change. What trends do you see as the biggest to come in 2016?

Townsend: Creative sourcing beyond the agency walls is becoming an imperative. The art director/writer duo is heading for a shake-up with crowdsourcing agencies emerging at a rate of knots and agency disintermediation becoming a daily reality. The reinvention is inevitable and exciting at the same time. How this looks, is certainly still to be defined, but that it will happen, is beyond question.

7. Exciting. What’s next for your agency?

Townsend: The Holy Grail for us is to have numerous case studies proving the success of our model and hopefully entice a big brand to take up the proposition. Whilst the need remains greater for big brands to have a central ideation and strategic unit, it appears that the small to medium brands are more willing to try it. With four wins in the last 30 days, we certainly are seeing the nose of the plane off the ground, but we looking forward to some aerobatics.
Certainly an impressive start. For more on the agency, visit their website and follow them on on Twitter.

Article : http://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/196/12/136796.html

Open-sourced collaboration - by Haydn Townsend

[BizTrends 2016] Open-sourced collaboration

[BizTrends 2016] Open-sourced collaborationMy prediction for the coming year is that we’ll start to see the growth of a trend that has already taken root overseas: open-sourced collaboration.
I’m talking about bringing different creative resources together: a model which is slowly starting to gain traction in South Africa. As it gathers momentum, it’s going to reshape agencies’ role in the industry.In the past, the type of creative talent employed in agencies was mostly limited to above-the-line thinkers. However, brands now require solutions that go beyond print, TV and radio, and the type of creativity needed to engage with consumers in the current milieu means that we have to go beyond the traditional skills set, looking outside agency walls for that talent. For example, a successful activation may require input from artists, comedians, stage producers and scriptwriters rather than copywriters and art directors.

Shift in agency roles

Businesses around the world have already been bringing together disparate skills in this way for some time, but it’s something new for agencies. Even so, it’s a trend we’d best embrace swiftly; if not, we run the risk of disintermediation as clients approach creative practitioners directly.

The problem with this is that it poses a threat to brand consistency – without the agency acting as brand custodian, there is no one to ensure that a thread of cohesiveness runs through every brand execution. This means that, if agencies are to service their clients properly – and, more than this, ensure they remain relevant – they will have to find ways to bring other types of creativity into their pool.

Article : http://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/196/688/139273.html

But this, in turn, poses another challenge: most agencies won’t be able to afford to keep these resources on their books permanently; not when only one in, say, 10 jobs require these specialist skills. So we’ll have to find a way to manage freelance input. My prediction is, therefore, that agencies will come to rely less on in-house teams.

There are implications for clients, too: they have to learn to be comfortable dealing with creatives outside of the advertising world, people who are not brand-driven and who may balk at the idea of bending their creativity to suit the brand’s agenda. So here, too, is a new role for the agency: we’ll have to take the lead in a new relationship between client and creative, helping them understand each other’s needs. Almost like an editor of content.

It’s going to be a tricky balance, because these content producers don’t like being told how to handle their creativity, especially if it’s in the pursuit of commercial interests – they may see this as compromising their art.

Thus, for me, the biggest trend influencing the industry in the coming year is the shift in agency roles to becoming facilitators of external creativity.

Marketing spend under pressure - by James Cloete

[BizTrends 2016] Marketing spend under pressure

[BizTrends 2016] Marketing spend under pressureI’d like to see a resurgence of client spend during 2016 – but I’m not anticipating it. Instead, I think that the economy will continue to be under pressure, and this will shape the way that brands and marketers behave.

When businesses come under strain, marketing budgets always take the hit first. Although it’s been proven that brands that spend more during recessions tend to come out of the dips faster, the fact is that when bottom lines are under pressure, companies cut what they perceive to be the soft stuff – and in most cases, marketing falls into this category. Of course, this isn’t true of all companies, but there are very few organisations that are truly brand-led.

The decrease in marketing spend that I anticipate will mean that brands will have to be more creative in how they speak to consumers. I’m not just referring to original thinking, although that also applies; rather, marketers and their suppliers will have to be smart about how they use their apportioned spend.

Increase in digital media spend

As a result, we’re likely to see the use of digital and social media continue its upward trajectory, in spite of the fact that South Africans are not yet completely in touch and up to date insofar as technology is concerned. Still, they’re relatively cheap mediums, and as more media spend is invested in these areas and access to internet grows, we’ll see South African practitioners using them not just more often, but also more effectively and creatively.

Measurability need

Another consequence of the industry coming under economic pressure, and another reason for my opinion that there will be an increase in spend on social and digital media, is the need for measurability. Clients are demanding a trackable investment, and these channels deliver.

While I’m a big believer in brand building and brand advertising, which traditionally are achieved through consistent and long-term above the line communication, it’s very difficult to deliver or prove quick turnaround results in the ATL space. Brand building is, after all, a slow burn process and much of the effect that you make takes place on a subconscious level.

Now, I personally think that this is one of the most important shifts you can create among consumers or would-be consumers, but it’s much more subtle than the immediate and clearly visible results achieved through digital and social channels. The value of the impact you make can only be seen by looking back over long stretches of time.

I believe we’ll also see greater spend in other below-the-line areas, too, with big growth in shopper marketing especially.

The overall impact on the industry insofar as agencies are concerned, is that it’s going to become increasingly difficult for larger agencies to maintain their working models. I predict that, more and more, we’ll see smaller agencies servicing bigger clients with integrated TTL thinking and making use of outsourced creative and production resources in order to meet executional objectives. Expect to see agencies running leaner, shrinking and expanding according to clients’ requirements on a project-by-project basis.

Regardless of trends which may come and go in 2016, the one enduring truth is that the need for strong, insight-driven ideas will never go away. That was, is and will always be how you create resonant content and relevant communication between brands and consumers.

Article : http://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/196/687/139404.html

Making Love - By Gareth Lessing

[BizTrends 2016] Making love

[BizTrends 2016] Making love

We’re likely to see a few trends shaping the industry in 2016, from the shift in agency models – which is one of our main reasons for being – to the challenge of finding the best medium to engage consumers in a world of multiple mixed platforms.

Fear

However, the issue that I think will continue to affect us most (and not in a good way) is one that is seldom spoken of: agency fear. It’s been a theme in our industry for some time and, unfortunately, I see it continuing into 2016 – and probably beyond.

The fact is that agencies live in fear of angering clients by not giving them what they want when they want, no matter how outlandish the request. How many times do agency staffers tell clients that yes, of course they can produce a big idea, complete with costings and executions, in two days – knowing full well the strain this will place on all members of the agency.

So why do we do this? It’s simple: we’re scared to push back because of that well-known client threat: “We’ll find someone else who is willing to do it.” Losing a client just isn’t an option for agencies, because they need every cent. Otherwise, staff cuts or even closure may ensue.

Article : http://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/196/688/139272.html

Of course, as with everything, there are exceptions to the rule. There are still clients out there who don’t rule by fear, and to them I say a sincere thank you.

This is the core difference between a good client and a bad one. The difference between a good creative director and a bad one. An MD, a CEO – you name it. Think of Calogero who asked Sonny, the mafia boss, in the movie A Bronx Tale: “Would you rather be loved, or feared?” Sonny chose fear – and, two days later, was shot.

Now, I’m not saying I want to go on a shooting spree, but my point is that nothing truly great comes from fear. On the other hand, when you love someone, you want to please them. You want to impress them. In fact, you will go to the end of the world for them. It’s only when you really love someone that you will take the time to talk to them in order to truly understand their needs.

Truth

I never feared my father; because I loved him and respected him, I never wanted to let him down. I wanted to make him proud of me. It’s that desire not to let someone down that draws out the extra bit of effort. It’s that care for each other that will keep every agency person motivated and willing to push harder in the search for the elusive creative nut. This is the truth that I wish clients would come to realise.

Love

I would love to see our industry morph into one that actually sticks together, agency and client alike. And as cheesy as this may sound, I’d like us to fall romantically in love with each other. Because then we really can do great things, and maybe even achieve what is probably the most difficult challenge facing today’s marketers: connecting on a meaningful level with this millennial generation that knows our tricks far too well.

So I ask you: Would you rather be feared? Or would you rather be loved?

Article : http://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/196/688/139272.html

Contact

Head Office

Contact Number : Tel : 27 11 795 6300
Address : 42 Homestead Road, Rivonia, Gauteng, South Africa
Email : admin@pangeaultima.co.za
Website : http://www.pangeaultima.co.za

© Copyright - Pangea Ultima - 2016 . Web by Kavod